Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Developing Countries?

Can we still categorize countries as developed, developing and undeveloped? According to Gapminder.org, probably not. they use indicators like birthrate and life expectancy to show how countries have progressed over the last century.  Check out their cart Stop calling them "developing countries"  and click on the play button at the start of the timeline. Each circle represents a different countries. Who develops first and why do you think that is? What is going on with China and India? This site is really informative and interactive, so have fun with it!

Sunday, June 23, 2013

The Language We Speak

Here is a great website that uses variations in the way English is spoken to create some pretty cool maps, Dialect Survey Results.

The map above shows where people drink soda (red), pop (blue), or coke (green). These maps were created using a survey and you can use a drop down menu on the left to check out all of the questions, responses and maps. As you play with the maps, think about all of the different influences on our culture. Enjoy!

Monday, June 17, 2013

What happened to India's exploding population?


As you can see on the map above, India is getting close to the replacement rate. When did that happen? How did that happen? Basically as India developed a middle class, with time and money to spare, they discovered they wanted to do other things besides spend that time and money on more children. Television has had a huge impact on this as most shows show families with smaller sizes. You can read all about this recent development in  Population Bomb? So Wrong, by Marin Lewis .

Monday, June 10, 2013

Geography Photography

National Geographic Traveler is running a photography contest. You can view some of the beautiful entries here.

Addicting New Geography Game - Locatestreet

If you enjoyed Geoguesser, you will quickly become addicted to Locatestreet. Like Geoguesser it uses Google Street images. This game gives you clues and you actually have multiple choices to choose from. Don't let that fool you, this game is more complicated because if you choose the correct location, you get a second round. In round two you have to pinpoint the location on a map. Points are alloted and tallied as they are earned. Give it a try!

Monday, June 3, 2013

What happens when plates collide?

 Continental drift isn't just something that happened a long time ago. We see it today in the form of earthquakes along the fault lines and new volcanoes. USGS has been monitoring new volcanoes around Alaska and you can read the full article here:

A Blast of a Find: 12 New Alaskan Volcanoes




One of the newest volcanic vents discovered in Southeast Alaska is an underwater volcanic cone in Behm Canal near New Eddystone rock.

JAMES BAICHTAL, U.S. FOREST SERVICE

"In the past three years, 12 new volcanoes have been discovered in Southeast Alaska, and 25 known volcanic vents and lava flows re-evaluated, thanks to dogged work by geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Forest Service. Sprinkled across hundreds of islands and fjords, most of the volcanic piles are tiny cones compared to the super-duper stratovolcanoes that parade off to the west, in the Aleutian Range."





This spectacular columnar joint pattern in lava exposed in Alaska's Suemez Island formed when the lava flowed next to a glacier about 700,000 years ago.

SUSAN KARL, U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

"But the Southeast's volcanoes are in a class by themselves, the researchers found. A chemical signature in the lava flows links them to a massive volcanic field in Canada. Unusual patterns in the lava also point to eruptions under, over and alongside glaciers, which could help scientists pinpoint the size of Alaska's mountain glaciers during past climate swings.

"It's giving us this serendipitous window on the history of climate in Southeast Alaska for the last 1 million years," said Susan Karl, a research geologist with the USGS in Anchorage and the project's leader. "